Wednesday, November 30, 2011

0279.txt

date: Mon, 14 Sep 2009 16:14:30 +0100 (BST)
from: P.JonesatXYZxyz.ac.uk
subject: Re: new zealand temps: crutem2 to crutem3
to: "Tim Osborn" <t.osbornatXYZxyz.ac.uk>

Tim,
Maybe you should see David if he can recall making any changes to land
stations over NZ - and if so when? There might have been changes
immedaiately after Jones and Moberg (2003) that Harry wasn't aware of.
Another thought is to check whether your programs work with CRUTEM2 as
of now. CRUTEM2 data are on the CRU site, go to the temp page and they
are near the bottom.

Cheers
Phil

> Phil, I had a look at figure 1 of Brohan et al. showing land station
> coverage and coloured dots for new/deleted/edited stations. All in
> New Zealand are black, implying no change from CRUTEM2! I'll check
> with programs again in case I screwed up, but fairly confident I
> didn't -- so its rather confusing as to why CRUTEM2 and 3 are so
> different over New Z. in summer. Tim
>
> At 21:27 11/09/2009, you wrote:
>> Tim,
>> This one would be good enough. I don't know if it is the right one.
>> We
>>also got some additional NZ stations as well.
>> It is more about exposures in Australia - that cause the pre-1910
>> data
>>to be less good.
>> For NZ, it is more work on the early NZ data. Exposures would be a
>>problem, but before about 1880. There was a gap in much NZ data during
>>the 1870s. It may be that we had only a couple of sites for V2, but got
>>several more for V3.
>>
>> Cheers
>> Phil
>>
>> > Hi Phil,
>> >
>> > I'm wondering how best to explain the cause of the change in New
>> Zealand
>> > summer temps from crutem2 to crutem3. I could just say that crutem3
>> uses
>> > differently (or better?) homogenised stations records from some
>> locations
>> > (could I say that the homogenisation adjusted for 19th century
>> exposures
>> > being different?), with a pers. comm. to you. But if there's a
>> reference
>> > for homogenised New Zealand data, that would be better. I saw this
>> one,
>> > by Jim Salinger that mentions "newly homogenised SW Pacific data" and
>> > includes New Zealand. Would this be what you now use?
>> >
>> > Salinger MJ (1995)
>> > Southwest Pacific temperatures: trends in maximum and minimum
>> temperatures
>> > Atmospheric Research
>> > Volume 37, Issues 1-3, July 1995, Pages 87-99
>> > Minimax Workshop
>> >
>> > doi:10.1016/0169-8095(94)00071-K
>> >
>> >
>> <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V95-3YRS4V8-H&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1007383597&_rerunOrigin=google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=f3e472de489b183ec5de1f89ff066304>
>> >
>> > Though I can't download the PDF from home to see what it says.
>> >
>> > Tim
>> >
>> > --
>> > Dr. Tim Osborn
>> > RCUK Academic Fellow
>> > Climatic Research Unit
>> > School of Environmental Sciences
>> > University of East Anglia
>> > Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
>> > www.cru.uea.ac.uk/~timo/
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>
> Dr Timothy J Osborn, Academic Fellow
> Climatic Research Unit
> School of Environmental Sciences
> University of East Anglia
> Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
>
> e-mail: t.osbornatXYZxyz.ac.uk
> phone: +44 1603 592089
> fax: +44 1603 507784
> web: http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/~timo/
> sunclock: http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/~timo/sunclock.htm
>
>
>


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